October 17, 2011

Reality TV Blogger Launches Reality Ravings Consultancy

Australian reality TV blogger Emma Ashton is launching a consultancy, Reality Ravings Consultancy, that will "offer expert advisory services to both potential reality show contestants, and to the shows themselves."

The consultancy is built on Ashton's achievements with Reality Ravings, an Australian reality TV blog, she launched in 2007. Her blogging status led to her identification as a reality TV expert by the media, leading to numerous media appearances in Australia. She also launched a Reality TV Insights Survey that has given her more media attention and helped establish her as an industry researcher.

For $275, wannabe reality TV performers will receive:

A consultation over Skype or phone to find out about you, including your background, skills and personality and why you want to go on the show;

A tailored application is drafted and sent to you to upload online or send in; and

Ongoing advice when you get to the interview rounds.

Ashton also offers:

Speaking engagements including panels, conferences, lectures, workshops and seminars about blogging and reality TV;

Freelance writing for articles, reviews, submissions, speeches and reports;

Pre-production and concept testing advice for new reality shows;

Post-production evaluation;

Research related to reality TV shows; and

Expert commentary on reality TV.

I don't have any idea how well the various aspects of Ashton's offerings are being received but this is certainly a nice look at how one can build a brand and related services around a topically-focused blog. The survey is particularly smart for building authority.

Personal note:

Back when I blogged about hip hop business, I tried to find partners to create a hip hop demographic survey. My research training is in qualitative methods so I needed a quantitative partner but I was unable to pay for the needed support.

I understood why researchers outside of hip hop were only interested in participating if paid but I could never understand the short-sightedness of hip hop marketers who could have been involved. It would have given any of them national visibility that would relate to their business interests and yet none of the people I discussed it with could see that. Then again, that lack of vision helps explain why none of them have achieved national recognition in marketing since.